Introducing Character in Act 1: Character Chart

Here’s a sample chart. You should fill in as much as possible because it forces you think about aspects of the character you might have overlooked. Not all those details necessarily need to be jammed into the script. But the more the writer knows about his characters, the more clearly those characters will come through. Also, these charts will act as a handy reference tool when you forget what kind of car a character is driving or where they come from.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION

age: height: weight: voice:
eyes: hair: build:  
health:   scars, marks:  
clothing:      

LIVING SITUATION

occupation: car:
home: pets:

PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS

goals:

attitude:

motives:

habits/mannerisms:

sports:

peeves:

hobbies:

magazines/books:

favorite movies, TV shows:

favorite music:

favorite websites:

ringtones:

BACKGROUND

birthplace:

parents:

spouse/lover:

children:

military:

education:


These tips came from the workshop

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